Year of Publication

2016

Degree Name

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering

Document Type

Master's Thesis

College

Engineering

Department

Biomedical Engineering

First Advisor

Dr. Babak Bazrgari

Abstract

Non-specific low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem affecting a substantial portion of the population. The current treatments offered for non-specific LBP are oftentimes unsuccessful because the acting mechanism(s) of most treatment options are unknown. Obtaining a better understanding about the acting mechanism behind existing treatment options is, therefore, essential for the improvement of non-specific LBP treatment and management. The objective of this study was to gain a more comprehensive understanding about the acting mechanism of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulative therapy, specifically the impact that high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulative therapy may have on the active and passive spinal musculoskeletal stabilizing subsystems along with the resultant spinal stability for healthy participants. A pre-post intervention study design completed by six healthy participants was used to quantify changes in the above noted aspects of spinal stability using a series of tests performed both before and after six sessions of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulative therapy. The tests included seated balancing tests, lower back range of motion tests, and stress relaxation test. The six sessions of high velocity low amplitude spinal manipulative therapy did not significantly affect any of the test measurements among our healthy participant group.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

http://dx.doi.org/10.13023/ETD.2016.031

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